The Council Of Fashion Designers Of America And Fabletics Join Forces For Fashion Targets Breast Cancer 

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The Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) is partnering with the stylish, high-quality and accessible active wear brand Fabletics for Fashion Targets Breast Cancer (FTBC). Iconic actress, fashion tastemaker, mother of two and Fabletics co-founder Kate Hudson is serving as the FTBC ambassador for October.

As part of the partnership, Fabletics will be launching an FTBC-branded outfit on September 28, “National Women’s Health & Fitness Day,” which will dovetail into October’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The 3-piece look will feature a tank, sports bra and capri, with proceeds benefitting FTBC. Fabletics will also host an FTBC event at all its locations that day with a percentage of sales donated to FTBC. Hudson follows an impressive list of previous FTBC Ambassadors including Naomi Campbell, Christy Turlington, and Karolina Kurkova among others.

“We couldn’t be more excited to have Kate join the history and legacy of Fashion Targets Breast Cancer. It’s a meaningful cause to the CFDA and one that we work year round to help fundraise for. With Fabletics’ focus on health and fitness, Kate is a perfect Ambassador to the cause and understands the importance of how fashion can support philanthropic endeavors,” said CFDA President and CEO Steven Kolb.

The Fashion Targets Breast Cancer (FTBC) name and symbol were created by Ralph Lauren and subsequently entrusted to the CFDA Foundation. In 2011, FTBC began working with The New York Community Trust to develop a focused grant making program covering the critical areas of breast cancer screening, treatment, and survival. It established the Fashion Targets Breast Cancer Fund, which is guided by an advisory committee of fashion industry representatives, experts in the content area, and Trust staff, to make grants to New York City organizations that assist women with breast cancer. Specifically, grants from the FTBC Fund help low-income, minority, and immigrant women, with screening, treatment, and support services to help them cope with their cancer.